Movie Man Dem: Episode 3 (22-11-2022) Our Great Friend M’Baku

Movie Man Dem: Episode 3 (22-11-2022) Our Great Friend M'Baku Wakanda Forever is here, but does it live up to the hype? We get into the long-awaited sequel. What worked, what failed, and, the worst cinema experiences known to man. On top of that, the news of the week. We've got a lot to talk about, so naturally, it's our biggest episode yet.

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Movie Man Dem: Episode 2 (08-11-2022) Return To Wakanda

Movie Man Dem: Episode 2 (08-11-2022) Returning to Wakanda Here comes Wakanda Forever, the most anticipated sequel with cat people fighting underwater not named Avatar. In anticipation of the sequel finally coming out, we do a deep dive into the career of Ryan Coogler, the top MCU directors, the legacy of Chadwick Boseman, and our predictions for the new movie

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Movie Man Dem: Episode 1 (05-11-2022) Context Clues

Movie Man Dem: Episode 1 (05-11-2022) Context Clues Welcome to the premiere episode of Movie Man Dem! After months of talking about it, we're finally doing it. In our first episode we talk about the origins of the podcast, and our origins as lifelong movie fans. We also get into the careers of our current crop of leading men: Dwayne Johnson, John Krasinski, and Will Smith. At some point, we talk the fantastic year in horror that is 2022. 

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‘Black Adam’ (2022) Review

'Black Adam' (2022) Review: A Fair Start ‘Black Adam’ has been a long time coming. In the 15 years since Dwayne Johnson’s casting, superhero films have become the most successful in the world, and Johnson himself, an international superstar. Over a decade of development delays have led to Johnson’s super debut as the titular character. It’s also led to one of the most derivative superhero movies in recent memory.That is especially frustrating given what ‘Black Adam’ purports to be. The movie centres on its anti-hero, branding itself as a movie about a different breed of superperson. When he awakens after 5,000 years of slumber, he reintroduces himself to the modern world in murderous fashion. Black Adam isn’t concerned with ethics and legal restrictions, and he’s more than willing to take a life. He’s not like other superheroes, unless of course you count Deadpool, Wolverine, Wonder Woman, Batman, and even Superman, all of whom have taken lives with no ambiguity and in high definition. As a superhero film, ‘Black Adam’ positions itself as a breath of fresh air, but feels more akin to a carbon copy. Several of the characters feel like alternates for what’s already been depicted on screen in better films. While it’s far from original, knocking ‘Black Adam’ for being derivative feels punitive. The medium of comics is notorious for duplicating abilities and storylines ad infinitum. The worth of a good story isn’t in its originality, but in what it does with its…

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‘Halloween Ends’ (2022) Review

'Halloween Ends' (2022) Review: Solid Send Off It’s been 4 years since Michael Myers was last seen. Laurie Strode has lost her daughter, and devotes her life to moving past the trauma she’s endured since the fateful night in 1978, when the Bogeyman came to her door. She makes the best out of a complicated life in a town that’s turned her tragedy into tittle-tattle. As evil rears its ugly mask, the Strode family must once again battle their homicidal harasser, for one last time. A well done fright fest will give you all the chills down your spine, along with strong characters and story. Most get by on getting the audience to keep the light on at night with their shock and awe, but a series like ‘Halloween’ has the legacy to offer up a better class of horror.‘Halloween Ends’ is one such film. The conclusion to the Michael Myers saga has all the requisite slashings for a nail biting good time, yet manages to give its characters a dramatic and endearing treatment. The film paints a portrait of survival in the aftermath of tragedy. Jamie Lee Curtis plays a woman living with her PTSD, passing on her coping to her similarly afflicted grandchild. There’s a sense of hope that’s been missing since her return in 2018.The film has lofty ambitions for its characters and dares to delve deeply into their psyche. Rohan Campell’s Corey Cunningham is a falsely accused pariah navigating…

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The Tragedy of Denzel: Smith Vs. Washington

The Tragedy of Denzel: Smith Vs Washington Tonight is the 94th Oscars. It’s a momentous occasion for several reasons. After two years of lockdowns and empty cinemas, movie theatres have returned. Last year’s Oscars were hampered by covid-19 restrictions. Tonight, as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences celebrates the best in movies, viewers can expect a return to form for the biggest night in movies. Those up for awards have no doubt prepared their speeches. From first time nominees Kristen Stewart to record breakers like Steven Spielberg. Other nominees are Javier Bardem for ‘Being the Ricardos’, Benedict Cumberbatch for ‘Power of the Dog’, and Andrew Garfield for ‘Tick Tick Boom’. Each of their performances deserve acclaim, but the real contest is between two kings. Will Smith for ‘King Richard’ and Denzel Washington for ‘The Tragedy of Macbeth’.Will Smith is far from an Oscars novice. Over the last 2 decades he’s been in the conversation for some powerful performances. Yet for Smith, the mark has always been missed. In 2016 his performance in ‘Concussion’ was good enough for the Golden Globes, but got no love from the Oscars. He’s been nominated twice before. Once for his iconic role in ‘The Pursuit of Happyness’, and for bringing Muhammad Ali’s story to the screen in ‘Ali’.Denzel on the other hand, is an Oscars darling. This is his 9th nomination for best actor, of which he’s won 2 already. Once in 1990 for his role…

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‘Spider-Man: No Way Home’ (2021) Review

'Spider-Man: No Way Home' (2021) Review: Peter Problems The last 2 years have been tension filled for cinemas, and cinema lovers. We’ve all watched with bated breath to see the theatres we spent so many summers in weather the storm of stagnant business. Films have been sold on their ability to deliver a once in a lifetime cinema experience. Titans have battled, Bond came back, and somehow, the Matrix will be resurrected. Now as the year comes to a close, your friendly neighbourhood Spider-Man has returned to give audiences a reason to go back to the cinemas.Yet the film’s reunion isn’t quite as romantic. ‘Spider-Man No Way Home’ sees Peter Parker facing the demons of his past. Well, sort of. Demons of Peter Parker, just not the one played so nervously by Tom Holland. How they get there is a mix of Doctor Strange magic, and Peter Parker idiocy. Willem Dafoe, Alfred Molina, and Jamie Foxx are among the most frequent familiar faces, yet there’s a slight disconnect. It’s fun to see their characters played once again by their original actors, but they can sometimes feel out of place.The characters shine when the movie plays to their strengths. Green Goblin and Doctor Octopus have some of the film’s most tender moments, carrying with them the sincerity of their original roles. Dafoe and Molina are the scene stealers in the movie, with a special mention to Dafoe for bringing back the terror he…

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‘Venom: Let There Be Carnage’ (2021) Review

'Venom Let Ther Be Carnage' (2021) Review: Symbiote Squabbles At just over 90 minutes, ‘Venom Let There Be Carnage’ is miniscule compared to your usual comic book blockbuster. The film is content with keeping things brief, something that mostly works to the movie’s advantage. The action is charged and all semblance of fat has been trimmed, but viewers might find themselves out of breath by the end of the first act.The sequel sprints from the starting line and keeps momentum at a near disorienting speed. It blazes through what feel like important story details, and keeps you from taking stock of them before it moves on to the next scene. Thankfully, once it’s laid down the building blocks with haste, ‘Venom Let There Be Carnage’ has a solid foundation for the main attraction.Watching Tom Hardy argue with himself is once again a sight to behold. Venom and Eddie Brock might be joined at the hip, but their minds are far from symbiotic in this film. Turns out, an alien being with a hunger for human flesh is a less than ideal roommate. Especially one that you can’t ever get away from. Then again Eddie Brock’s narcissism doesn’t make him an ideal candidate for friendship. The movie makes you invested in the relationship between host and symbiote much like a bickering couple in a romantic comedy. ‘Venom Let There Be Carnage’ cares more about the relationships with its characters, than the overall plot. A…

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‘Queenpins’ (2021) Review

'Queenpins' (2021) Review: Good Girls Break Bad Turn on your television in the last decade and you’d likely come across a familiar premise. A mild mannered suburbanite turns to a life of crime to help make ends meet. Consumed by greed, and the thrill of a life of crime, they push their luck, becoming more ruthless as they evade the authorities. ‘Queenpins’ takes that premise, but instead of your typical criminal enterprises like drugs or weapons, the protagonists of this film make their riches off the sale of counterfeit coupons.  Forged discounts on supermarket goods isn’t the most exciting trade, a fact the movie acknowledges frequently. Yet for Kristen Bell’s Connie and Kirby Howell-Baptiste’s Jojo, getting groceries at a fraction of the cost is an unmatched adrenaline rush. There’s plenty of jokes mined out of their devotion to discounts, and it goes a long way to making you care about coupons. You will walk out of the film knowing more about coupons than you ever cared to. While they might be savvy shoppers, they’re far from the career criminals they purport to be. Much of their success in the film is largely due to the fact that coupons are not high on the priority list for most law enforcement agencies. Except of course for Paul Walter Hauser’s Ken, a hilariously sad loss prevention officer with a penchant for spotting forgeries. Ken teams up with Vince Vaughn’s Simon, who’s giving his best performance…

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‘Shang Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings’ (2021) Review

'Shang Chi And The Legend Of The Ten Rings' (2021) Review: Martial Arts Marvel After crafting a universe spanning 24 films, multiple television series, the 25th film in the interconnected Marvel franchise attempts to go back to basics. Introducing a new face to its ever growing pantheon of characters with Shang-Chi, the first ever Asian leading a major American superhero blockbuster. As the audience meets Shang for the first time, we enter into a world that’s become all too familiar, almost to the movie’s detriment. It’s a difficult thing to evoke surprise in a universe where the impossible has been seen time and time again. The film acknowledges this in Shang Chi’s first fight. In it he battles a gang of experienced martial artists, and a man with a glowing blade for a hand, adequately named Razor Fist. Instead of shock and awe, the onlookers are mostly unbothered by what’s occurring. One character even seized the opportunity to live stream the event to his audience. The indifference of the citizens lets the action commence without consequence as Simu Liu tears through his opponents like a Jackie Chan tribute artist.The film’s attitude towards its more fantastic elements reflects the journey of Shang Chi himself. He’s a young, unmotivated millennial with no conception of anything close to a 5 year plan. As the movie progresses Shang is revealed as less of a hero in the making, but more of a reluctant one. As he moves closer…

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